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Sharing experience: A simple way to mount Ruddo pedals

Hardware - X-Plane.Org Forum - forums.x-plane.org
I realize that there relatively few users of the Ruddo Pedals by Virtual Fly on this forum since it is not the most popular model of ruder pedals, due to their high price. Yet, for those who own them, may be helpful to learn about a simple and efficient way to mount them.

The problem with the Ruddo pedals is that they closely emulate rudder pedals in Cessna airplanes: they are quite stiff (stiffness is adjustable, but one wants them to be realistically stiff!), and have relatively small range of motion (compared to some other popular brands of rudder pedals for flight sims). Even though they are heavy, the amount of force exerted by the sim pilot can make them move, or, if you engage toe brakes, may tip the whole pedals assembly along with the base over the rear edge. Virtual Fly of course knows about this problem. They strongly recommend that the pedals are mounted, attached to something. They suggest three possible mounting options: bolt pedals to the floor, attach them to the floor with Velcro straps, or attach them to your chair with a strap. They even include Velcro and a roll of strap for the chair in the box. None of these methods, however, is practical. I do not want to use screws on my hardwood floor, I do not want to stick velcro to it since it may leave glue residue, and strapping pedals to the chair is ... kind of strange and awkward.

There is an option to push the pedals all the way to the wall, but they are still fairly unstable and still can tip over the back edge when toe brakes are engaged, at least as far as the top of the pedals can go to the wall. Also, it may be a little too far for those who do not have very long legs.

I came up with a simple design which takes just several hours to complete, including finish. All that it takes is a piece of 3/4 inch plywood, two brackets from the Home Depot, some screws, and a few very basic power tools - a track saw, a sander, a vacuum, and a drill.

The pictures below, I think, show the design better than I can explain. The key is to provide support against the wall, above the baseboard and at the level or slightly above the toe brakes. The vertical piece of plywood attached to the brackets is offset relatively to the base plate by 3/4", which is the thickness of my baseboard. This way, both the bottom sheet of plywood and the vertical piece attached to the brackets get in contact with the baseboard and with the wall at the same time.

I predrilled pilot holes for screws to be able to move the pedals further to the back as/if needed. My son picked the current position, but the pedals may move back as he grows.

This design turned out to be very stable. The pedals can be as far from the wall as you need, they do not move anywhere, and do not tip over as they liked to do in the past. Also, more room for the USB cable!

 

Edited 2 hours ago by AIPDX

correction of several typos


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